02/8/20

Winners of the 2019 Fire and Ice Kids Art Contest

Announcing the winners of the 2019 Fire and Ice Kids Art Contest hosted by Frogs Are Green. It was our 10th annual contest and we had a wonderful response from around the world and right here in the USA, from California to Florida, and Jersey City. More categories and data to come. Meanwhile… the four main categories are below.

Thanks to our judges for 2019: Wendell Minor, Amy Elise de Jong, Jenna Firshein, Louis Aligo, Beverly D’Andrea and Mark Lerer.

Winners – Ages 3-6

1st place: NG Pak Hay Hayden, 5 years old, Hong Kong
2nd place: Chatchayanich Worabut, 6 years old, Thailand
3rd place: Mak Marcella Carissa, 4 years old, Hong Kong

Honorable Mentions:

Lai Wing Ka, 5 years old, Hong Kong
Or Hoi Man, Hailey, 4 years old, Hong Kong
Lui Yan Hei, Gloria, 4 years old, Hong Kong
Huang Tzu Chiao, 5 years old, Taiwan
Fong Shing Yan, Romeo, 4 years old, Hong Kong

1st-NG-Pak-Hay-Hayden-5-years-old-Hong-Kong-2019

1st-NG-Pak-Hay-Hayden-5-years-old-Hong-Kong-2019

2nd-Chatchayanich Worabut, age 6, Thailand, 2019

2nd-Chatchayanich Worabut, age 6, Thailand, 2019

3rd-MAK MARCELLA CARISSA -4yrs-Hong Kong,2019

3rd-MAK MARCELLA CARISSA -4yrs-Hong Kong,2019

LAI WING KA_5 yrs_Hong Kong, 2019

LAI WING KA_5 yrs_Hong Kong, 2019

Or Hoi Man, Hailey-4 yrs-Hong Kong-2019

Or Hoi Man, Hailey-4 yrs-Hong Kong-2019

Lui Yan Hei, Gloria-4 yrs-Hong Kong-2019

Lui Yan Hei, Gloria-4 yrs-Hong Kong-2019

Huang Tzu Chiao-5 years old-Taiwan,Industrial Forest, 2019

Huang Tzu Chiao-5 years old-Taiwan,Industrial Forest, 2019

Fong-Shing-Yan-Romeo-4-yrs-Hong-Kong-2019FRG

Fong-Shing-Yan-Romeo-4-yrs-Hong-Kong-2019FRG

1st-NG-Pak-Hay-Hayden-5-years-old-Hong-Kong-2019 thumbnail
2nd-Chatchayanich Worabut, age 6, Thailand, 2019 thumbnail
3rd-MAK MARCELLA CARISSA -4yrs-Hong Kong,2019 thumbnail
LAI WING KA_5 yrs_Hong Kong, 2019 thumbnail
Or Hoi Man, Hailey-4 yrs-Hong Kong-2019 thumbnail
Lui Yan Hei, Gloria-4 yrs-Hong Kong-2019 thumbnail
Huang Tzu Chiao-5 years old-Taiwan,Industrial Forest, 2019 thumbnail
Fong-Shing-Yan-Romeo-4-yrs-Hong-Kong-2019FRG thumbnail

Winners: Ages 7-9

1st place: Lucas Nam, 9 years old, California, USA
2nd place: Wimootta Aramsaengchan, 8 years old, Thailand
3rd place: Claire Chong, 9 years old, California, USA

Honorable Mentions:

Huang Tzu Wei, 8 years old, Taiwan
Grace Gao, 9 years old, USA
Duru Karadede, 9 years old, Turkey

1st-Lucas Nam, 9 years old, CA, USA, 2019

1st-Lucas Nam, 9 years old, CA, USA, 2019

2nd-Wimootta Aramsaengchan, age 8, Thailand, 2019

2nd-Wimootta Aramsaengchan, age 8, Thailand, 2019

3rd-Claire Chong, 9 years old, California, USA, 2019

3rd-Claire Chong, 9 years old, California, USA, 2019

Huang Tzu Wei_8 years old_Taiwan_Garbage forest, 2019

Huang Tzu Wei_8 years old_Taiwan_Garbage forest, 2019

Grace Gao_9 yrs_US, 2019

Grace Gao_9 yrs_US, 2019

DURU KARADEDE_9YEARS OLD_FROM TURKEY__GLACIER MELTING, 2019

DURU KARADEDE_9YEARS OLD_FROM TURKEY__GLACIER MELTING, 2019

1st-Lucas Nam, 9 years old, CA, USA, 2019 thumbnail
2nd-Wimootta Aramsaengchan, age 8, Thailand, 2019 thumbnail
3rd-Claire Chong, 9 years old, California, USA, 2019 thumbnail
Huang Tzu Wei_8 years old_Taiwan_Garbage forest, 2019 thumbnail
Grace Gao_9 yrs_US, 2019 thumbnail
DURU KARADEDE_9YEARS OLD_FROM TURKEY__GLACIER MELTING, 2019 thumbnail

Winners: Ages 10-12

1st place: Angela Kim, 11 years old, California, USA
2nd place: Viara Pencheva, 10 years old, Bulgaria
3rd place: Olivia Jung, 12 years old, Canada

Honorable Mentions:

Napatson Nurat, 12 years old, Thailand
Emelin Saldana-Montes, 11 years old, MS 40, New Jersey, USA
Destiny Garcia, 11 years old, MS 40, New Jersey, USA
Worth Lodriga, 10 years old, Philippines
Kate Yeaseo Jeong, 11 years old, California, USA

1st-Angela Kim, 11 years old, CA, USA, 2019

1st-Angela Kim, 11 years old, CA, USA, 2019

2nd-VIARA PENCHEVA_10 years old_BULGARIA, 2019

2nd-VIARA PENCHEVA_10 years old_BULGARIA, 2019

3rd-Olivia Jung, age 12, Canada, 2019

3rd-Olivia Jung, age 12, Canada, 2019

Napatson Nurat, 12 yrs old, Thailand, 2019

Napatson Nurat, 12 yrs old, Thailand, 2019

Emelin Saldana-Montes, 11 yrs, MS 40, United States, 2019

Emelin Saldana-Montes, 11 yrs, MS 40, United States, 2019

Destiny Garcia, 11 yrs, MS 40 United States, 2019

Destiny Garcia, 11 yrs, MS 40 United States, 2019

Worth-Lodriga-10-yrs-old-Philippines-lion, 2019

Worth-Lodriga-10-yrs-old-Philippines-lion, 2019

Kate Yeaseo Jeong,11 years old, CA, USA, 2019

Kate Yeaseo Jeong,11 years old, CA, USA, 2019

1st-Angela Kim, 11 years old, CA, USA, 2019 thumbnail
2nd-VIARA PENCHEVA_10 years old_BULGARIA, 2019 thumbnail
3rd-Olivia Jung, age 12, Canada, 2019 thumbnail
Napatson Nurat, 12 yrs old, Thailand, 2019 thumbnail
Emelin Saldana-Montes, 11 yrs, MS 40, United States, 2019 thumbnail
Destiny Garcia, 11 yrs, MS 40 United States, 2019 thumbnail
Worth-Lodriga-10-yrs-old-Philippines-lion, 2019 thumbnail
Kate Yeaseo Jeong,11 years old, CA, USA, 2019 thumbnail

Winners; Ages 13-17

1st place: Jude Atchley, 16 years old, McNair Academic High School, Jersey City, NJ, USA
2nd place: Seohee Choi, 14 years old, California, USA
3rd place: Sujita Kongvach, 17 years old, Thailand

Honorable Mentions:

Amelia Stebbing, 17 years old, Florida, USA
Grace Thomas, 16 years old, USA
Ream Elkawaga, Age 16, McNair Academic High School, Jersey City, NJ, USA
Ekansha Tabhane, 13 years old, USA

1st-A Frog's View, by Jude Atchley, Age 16, McNair Academic High School, Jersey City, NJ, USA, 2019

1st-A Frog's View, by Jude Atchley, Age 16, McNair Academic High School, Jersey City, NJ, USA, 2019

2nd-Seohee Choi, 14 years old, CA, USA, 2019

2nd-Seohee Choi, 14 years old, CA, USA, 2019

3rd-Sujita Kongvach, 17 yrs old, Thailand, 2019

3rd-Sujita Kongvach, 17 yrs old, Thailand, 2019

Amelia Stebbing, 17, Jensen Beach Florida, 2019

Amelia Stebbing, 17, Jensen Beach Florida, 2019

Grace Thomas, age 16, United States, 2019

Grace Thomas, age 16, United States, 2019

Bleeding Into Life By Ream Elkawaga, Age 16, McNair Academic High School, Jersey City, NJ, USA, 2019

Bleeding Into Life By Ream Elkawaga, Age 16, McNair Academic High School, Jersey City, NJ, USA, 2019

Ekansha Tabhane, Age 13, United States of America, 2019

Ekansha Tabhane, Age 13, United States of America, 2019

1st-A Frog's View, by Jude Atchley, Age 16, McNair Academic High School, Jersey City, NJ, USA, 2019 thumbnail
2nd-Seohee Choi, 14 years old, CA, USA, 2019 thumbnail
3rd-Sujita Kongvach, 17 yrs old, Thailand, 2019 thumbnail
Amelia Stebbing, 17, Jensen Beach Florida, 2019 thumbnail
Grace Thomas, age 16, United States, 2019 thumbnail
Bleeding Into Life By Ream Elkawaga, Age 16, McNair Academic High School, Jersey City, NJ, USA, 2019 thumbnail
Ekansha Tabhane, Age 13, Country United States of America, 2019 thumbnail

Winners of “Best Environmental Message 2019”

1st Place: Zhang Anwen, 6 years old, Hong Kong
2nd Place: Jude Atchley, 16 years old, Jersey City, New Jersey, USA
3rd Place: Fong Yuk Chit, 8 years old, Hong Kong

Honorable Mentions:

Huang Tzu Chiao, 5 years old, Taiwan
Wirin Sukthongchalyakul,7 years old, Thailand
Chan Man Yee, 6 years old, Hong Kong
Kumud Pathak, 9 years old, USA
Jerrick Kamaraj, 11 years old, Jersey City, New Jersey, USA
Katha Patel, grade 12, Jersey City, NJ, USA

1st Place Winner Zhang Anwen, 6 years old, Hong Kong

1st Place Winner Zhang Anwen, 6 years old, Hong Kong

2nd Place Winner Jude Atchley, 16 years old, McNair Academic High School, Jersey City, NJ, USA

2nd Place Winner Jude Atchley, 16 years old, McNair Academic High School, Jersey City, NJ, USA "A Frog's View"

3rd Place Winner Fong Yuk Chit, 8 years old, Hong Kong

3rd Place Winner Fong Yuk Chit, 8 years old, Hong Kong

Huang Tzu Chiao, 5 years old, Taiwan,

Huang Tzu Chiao, 5 years old, Taiwan, "Industrial Forest"

Wirin Sukthongchaiyakul, 7 years old, Thailand

Wirin Sukthongchaiyakul, 7 years old, Thailand

Chan Man Yee, 6 years old, Hong Kong

Chan Man Yee, 6 years old, Hong Kong

Kumud Pathak, 9 years old, USA

Kumud Pathak, 9 years old, USA

Jerrick Kamaraj, 11 years old, Jersey City, NJ, USA

Jerrick Kamaraj, 11 years old, Jersey City, NJ, USA

Katha Patel, grade 12, Jersey City, NJ, USA

Katha Patel, grade 12, Jersey City, NJ, USA

1st-Place-Zhang-Anwen-6-yrs-Hong-Kong-2019 thumbnail
2nd-Place-A Frog's View, by Jude Atchley, Age 16, McNair Academic High School, Jersey City, NJ, USA, 2019 thumbnail
3rd-Place-Fong-Yuk-Chit-8-yrs-Hong-Kong-2019 thumbnail
Huang Tzu Chiao-5 years old-Taiwan,Industrial Forest, 2019 thumbnail
Wirin Sukthongchaiyakul, age 7, Thailand-2019 thumbnail
Chan-Man-Yee-6-yrs-Hong-Kong-2019 thumbnail
Kumud Pathak, 9 years, USA-2019 thumbnail
Jerrick-Kamaraj-11-yrs-old-Jersey-City-NJ-USA-2019 thumbnail
KATHA-PATEL-JERSEY-CITY-NJ-USA-GRADE-12-2019 thumbnail

Winners of “Best Black and White Artwork 2019”

1st Place: Setthasan Jirathanaprasert, 14 years old, Thailand
2nd Place: Hermes Tsai, 9 years old, USA
3rd Place: Kyeongwon Lee, 15 years old, USA

Honorable Mention:

Sunattra Kongrach, 15 years old, Thailand

1st place, Setthasan Jirathanaprasert, 14 years old, Thailand

1st place, Setthasan Jirathanaprasert, 14 years old, Thailand

2nd place, Hermes Tsai, 9 years old, California, USA

2nd place, Hermes Tsai, 9 years old, California, USA

3rd place, Kyeongwon Lee, 15 years old, California, USA, 2019

3rd place, Kyeongwon Lee, 15 years old, California, USA, 2019

Sunattra Kongvach, 15 yrs old, Thailand, 2019

Sunattra Kongvach, 15 yrs old, Thailand

1st-place-Setthasan-Jirathanaprasert-14-years-old-Thailand-2019 thumbnail
2nd-place-Hermes Tsai, 9 years old, California, USA, 2019 thumbnail
3rd-place-Kyeongwon Lee, 15 years old, California, USA-2019 thumbnail
Sunattra Kongvach, 15 yrs old, Thailand, 2019 thumbnail

Winners of “Best 3D Artwork 2019”

1st Place: Seohee Choi, 14 years old, California, USA
2nd Place: Kate Yeaseo Jeong, 11 years old, California, USA
3rd Place: Claire Chong, 9 years old, California, USA

Honorable Mentions:

Chloe Jin, 10 years old, California, USA
Kristina Danilenko, 7 years old, Russia, Siberia

1st place, Seohee Choi, 14 years old, CA, USA, 3D, 2019

1st place, Seohee Choi, 14 years old, CA, USA

2nd place, Kate Yeaseo Jeong, 11 years old, California, USA, 3D, 2019

2nd place, Kate Yeaseo Jeong, 11 years old, California, USA

3rd place, Claire Chong, 9 years old, California, USA, 3D, 2019

3rd place, Claire Chong, 9 years old, California, USA

Chloe Jin, 10 years old, California, USA, 3D, 2019

Chloe Jin, 10 years old, California, USA

Kristina Danilenko, 7 years old, Russia, Siberia, Novosibirsk city, 3D, 2019

Kristina Danilenko, 7 years old, Russia, Siberia, Novosibirsk City

1st-place-Seohee Choi, 14 years old, CA, USA-3D-2019 thumbnail
2nd-place-Kate Yeaseo Jeong, 11 years old, California, USA, 3D, 2019 thumbnail
3rd-place-Claire Chong, 9 years old, California, USA-3D-2019 thumbnail
Chloe Jin, 10 years old, California, USA, 3D, 2019 thumbnail
Kristina Danilenko, 7 years old, Russia, Siberia, Novosibirsk city, 3D, 2019 thumbnail
02/17/19

Winners of the 2018 Rainforest Photo Contest

We’re pleased to announce the winners of the 2018 Frogs Are Green Rainforest Photo Contest.
 

1st Place, Keeled slug eating snake, Pareas Carinatus, photographed by Kris Bell

1st Place, Keeled slug eating snake, Pareas Carinatus, photographed by Kris Bell.

2nd Place, Asian Vine Snake, Ahaetulla Prasina, photographed by Shani Cohen

2nd Place, Asian Vine Snake, Ahaetulla Prasina, photographed by Shani Cohen

3rd Place, A nonchalant frog by Elliot Pelling, photographer

3rd Place, A nonchalant frog by Elliot Pelling, photographer

Maned Forest Lizard (Broncochela jubata), Farits Alhadi

Maned Forest Lizard (Broncochela jubata), Farits Alhadi

Harlequin Tree Frog (Rhacophorus pardalis)-South Kalimantan, Zain Basriansyah

Harlequin Tree Frog (Rhacophorus pardalis)-South Kalimantan, Zain Basriansyah

Farits Alhadi, Chiromantis vittiger, The male guarding his eggs until hatching, Indonesia

Farits Alhadi, Chiromantis vittiger, The male guarding his eggs until hatching, Indonesia

Cave Racer - Orthriophis taeniurus, photographed by Elliot Pelling

Cave Racer - Orthriophis taeniurus, photographed by Elliot Pelling

1st-Place-Keeled-slug-eating-snake-Pareas-Carinatus-Photographed-by-Kris-Bell thumbnail
2nd-Place-Asian-Vine-Snake-Ahaetulla-Prasina-photographed-by-Shani-Cohen thumbnail
3rd-Place-a-nonchalant-frog-Elliot-Pelling-photographer thumbnail
Maned Forest Lizard (Broncochela jubata), Farits Alhadi thumbnail
Harlequin Tree Frog (Rhacophorus pardalis)-South Kalimantan, Zain Basriansyah thumbnail
farits alhadi, Chiromantis vittiger, The male guarding his eggs until hatching, Indonesia thumbnail
Cave Racer - Orthriophis taeniurus, Elliot Pelling thumbnail

 

Winners:

1st Place – Kris Bell, Keeled slug-eating snake (Pareas carinatus), photographed in Thailand.
2nd Place – Shani Cohen, Asian Vine Snake – Ahaetulla prasina, photographed at Krabi Province, Thailand.
3rd Place – Elliot Pelling, A nonchalant frog. A green vine snake (Ahaetulla nasuta) having just caught a frog (Fejervarya kudremukhensis).
 

Honorable Mentions:

Farits Alhadi, Maned Forest Lizard (Broncochela jubata) This lizard was photographed in West Java, Indonesia.
Zain Basriansyah, Harlequin Tree Frog (Rhacophorus pardalis)-South Kalimantan
Farits Alhadi, Chiromantis vittiger – The male guarding his eggs until hatching, Indonesia.
Elliot Pelling, Cave Racer – Orthriophis taeniurus
 

06/28/18

Salamander from the Rainforest painted on Catch Basin

Update from the corner of Bleecker Street and Central Avenue in Jersey City Heights!

 

Jersey City’s adopt a catch basin program is thriving! It’s very simple. Sign up to take care of a catch basin (storm drain) and the City of Jersey City will assign an artist to paint something original for you. It’s a win-win situation! The city receives help from the public to keep these drains clear of garbage and snow/ice in the winter and we get beautiful artwork that passers by admire. In addition, because they are of an environmental nature, it helps remind the public to keep the streets clean.

Swati Rastogi and Susan Newman salamander catch basin jersey city heights

Last year I noticed a beautiful artwork done by artist Swati Rastogi and requested her as the artist for my second corner (opposite last year’s frog). I was so excited when she contacted me this week because it was time for her to paint the corner.

Here’s what Swati wrote about this project:

“I never knew what a Salamander was until I was asked by the city to paint one at the corner of Central Avenue & Bleecker Street in Jersey City.

Susan Newman who adopted this catch basin has proudly named it “Biodiversity Matters” and is actively letting the residents know about the program.

Honestly this “adopt a catch basin” campaign is making the city much more vibrant and creating awareness for how important it is to keep the sewers clean.

Thank you for choosing me as your artist!.”

– Swati Rastogi

 

I wrote about this program last year in greater detail, so check out the article about the program and why it’s so important.

Adopt a Catch Basin Frog Art

01/21/18

Winners of the 2017 Amphibian and Reptile Photo Contest

Frogs Are Green wants to thank all the amazing wildlife photographers from around the world who submitted such a wide variety of amphibians and reptiles. We had frogs (of course), turtles and snakes, but we also received alligators, lizards and more! Between our photo contest and kids art contest we received entries from more than 30 countries this year! Thank our to our judges, John Dunstan, Gaye Dunstan, Sam Pesin, Beverly D’Andrea, Jerome China, and Devin Edmonds! We know how hard it is to choose!

– Susan Newman, founder,  Frogs Are Green Inc. – A New Jersey nonprofit organization.

 

Announcing the Winners of the 2017 Frogs Are Green Photo Contest

(Theme: Amphibians and Reptiles)

1st Place: Ronald Zimmerman – Emerald Glassfrog (Espadarana prosoblepon), Ecuador

Ronald Zimmerman, Emerald Glassfrog (Espadarana prosoblepon), Ecuador

Ronald Zimmerman, Emerald Glassfrog (Espadarana prosoblepon), Ecuador

2nd Place: Deep-Rajwar – King Portrait (Snake)

Deep-Rajwar - King Portrait

Deep-Rajwar – King Portrait

3rd Place: ©Ajay Singh Rajawat (Snake and Frog)

…And this time Reptile wins the game of death. Checkered Keelback snake swallowing Indian Bullfrog. Shot at Jhansi (Uttar Pradesh), India.

Ajay Singh Rajawat - Checkered Keelback snake swallowing Indian Bullfrog, India

Ajay Singh Rajawat – Checkered Keelback snake swallowing Indian Bullfrog, India.

Honorable Mention: Amanda Gilbert, Loveland, Ohio, (Turtle)

Amanda Gilbert, Loveland, Ohio, turtle

Amanda Gilbert, Loveland, Ohio, turtle

 

Winners of the “Best Amphibian Photo 2017”

1st Place: Sebastian Hernandez, Rhinella margaritifera, Ecuador

Sebastian-Hernandez-Rhinella margaritifera, Ecuador

Sebastian Hernandez, Rhinella margaritifera, Ecuador

2nd Place: Ronald Zimmerman, Gliding Treefrog (Agalychnis spurrelli), Ecuador

Ronald Zimmerman, Gliding Treefrog (Agalychnis spurrelli), Ecuador

Ronald Zimmerman, Gliding Treefrog (Agalychnis spurrelli), Ecuador

3rd Place: Krukarg-Tree frog on my coneflowers in my front yard near Tomahawk, Wisconsin

Krukarg-Tree frog on my coneflowers in my front yard near Tomahawk, Wisconsin

Krukarg-Tree frog on my coneflowers in my front yard near Tomahawk, Wisconsin

Honorable Mention: Linda Bailey – Birmingham, MI – Oophaga Pumilio Punta Laurent

Linda Bailey - Birmingham, MI - Oophaga Pumilio Punta Laurent

Linda Bailey – Birmingham, MI – Oophaga Pumilio Punta Laurent

 

Winners of the “Best Reptile Photo 2017”

1st Place: Miriam Christine, striking eyes,  Green Vine Snake (Ahaetulla nasuta)

Miriam Christine, striking eyes,  Green Vine Snake (Ahaetulla nasuta)

Miriam Christine, striking eyes, Green Vine Snake (Ahaetulla nasuta)

2nd Place: Deep Rajwar – Red-tailed bamboo pit viper

Deep Rajwar - Red-tailed bamboo pit viper

Deep Rajwar – Red-tailed bamboo pit viper

3rd Place: Christian Spencer, Python mask

Christian Spencer, Python mask

Christian Spencer, Python mask

10/20/15

Frog color patterns and the lack of color on the ventral surface

Frogs are a component of an exclusive cluster of the animal realm that have a part in the subtle equilibrium of both the ecosystem and the food chain. Frogs can be seen more or less any place apart from Antarctica. The majority of frogs are found in tropical areas and more frogs are found in the hotter countries. There are approximately 4,740 species of frogs on the planet. They are in fact remarkable creatures that come in a huge range of sizes as well as colors.

Frogs generally eat insects such as flies, as well as, worms and small fish. In some cultures, frogs are believed to bring good luck. Noticeably, some frogs, such as the poison dart frog, have an adequate amount of toxin in their miniscule bodies to take the life of a human being. Some species of frogs are capable of changing their skin color, and a few of them have a similar skin color as their environment.

By liz west (leopard frog2) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By liz west (leopard frog2) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Without a doubt, frogs have several natural predators. Generally frogs are responsive to predators, which is why frogs put down a lot of eggs at a time. A few of the main predators of frogs are comprised of reptiles, like snakes and lizards. Some fish will eat frogs, and birds will also eat frogs. Frogs are always in danger of predators and unfortunately, humans also eat frogs. Luckily, frogs have developed many techniques for defending themselves from these predators.

The color patterns of frogs and their lack of color on the ventral surface, allow frogs to escape from predators. Usually, the underside of the frog is a lighter color than the top side for the reason that if the frog is hanging on top of the water and a predator is searching for a frog, the suns glare makes the frog difficult to spot. There are shady marks on the bottom and as a result it doesn’t expose the silhouette of the frog. Some of the frog’s upper side is darker since when swimming in the underneath of a dark pond, so it coordinates with the bottom.

By fa:User:Juybari (fa:File:Frog in Water.jpg) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)], via Wikimedia Commons

By fa:User:Juybari (fa:File:Frog in Water.jpg) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)], via Wikimedia Commons

Frogs have a huge range of skin colors and patterns, which indeed help them from their natural predators. Colors can aid as a warning to predators that the frog may be toxic. Some frogs have the ability to change the color of their skin to adjust their heat soaking up rate, which assist them in managing their temperature. Just like other creatures, a frog’s skin and its color can be a sign of poison. Eating a blue frog can be deadly. So, the blue colored frogs offer a sign that they are not edible.

By Michael Gäbler (own work (eigenes Werk)) [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Michael Gäbler (own work (eigenes Werk)) [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Some studies have shown that the techniques for getting the better of a predator rely on the species of frog, but several of these resistances contain the utilization of color. It is found that some of the frogs have developed patterns on their backs that bamboozle or confuse aerial predators. The patterns cover up the shape of the frog; as a result, the predator doesn’t identify it as something safe to eat.

The largest parts of frogs are not dangerous, but there are some frogs that take advantage of poison as a self-protection tactic. Research reveals that some frogs have deadly poisons that could make a human harshly sick, or even kill someone. The toxic frogs such as the poison dart frog generally have brightly colored skin that stands as a caution. The toxic frogs have in fact very few predators. Frogs such as the barred leaf frog have light patterns on their legs and body. So, when the frog runs, these patterns will make the predator puzzled.

The animal kingdom makes use of a lot of tactics in order to save themselves from predators. Frogs are amazing and they use a lot of techniques to fool predators. Basically the upper surfaces of frogs are dark and go with their environment so that they are hidden from predators viewing them from above. The ventral surfaces of most of the frogs are normally a light color so that it will be disguised against the lighter sky while observed from underneath.

On land, a frog’s enemies will attack them from above and therefore, the color on its upper side serves as concealment. In water, the frog is susceptible to assault from below. For the most part, frog’s ventral surface is seldom uncovered to the sight of predators, so these surfaces don’t require camouflage. Frogs have a variety of patterns and colors that protects them from natural predators and harsh environments.

——–

Guest blog by Ligia Blake, who is a freelance blog writer and works for essayscouncil.com, a custom essay writing service with a passion of helping out students.

08/28/14

Eco-Interview: John Hamilton, Children’s Book Illustrator and Conservationist

John Hamilton, children's book illustrator with chameleon

When did this all begin? Please tell us a bit about your work.

I am an artist and illustrator based in Manchester UK. My artwork has always been narrative /story-based, using oil on canvas, printmaking, and large-scale collage. My work includes characters acting out various scenarios and role play, as if from a film or stage play. I often include animals or people dressed as animals. I recently had a children’s picture book published called “The Boy Who Really Really Really loves Lizards” aimed at 3-7 year olds.

Go quietly so as not to wake the butterflies' oil on canvas, 2013

What is your educational background and what led to this creative path?

My background is in Fine Art. I did my degree back in 1990 and have been a practicing artist since then. A couple of years ago I did a Masters degree in Children’s Book Illustration. For the final project I wrote the story about my son Oliver who was obsessed by visits to the Manchester Museum, From the age of two he has loved the museum and would spend hours there.

inside the vivarium - illustration from the book

What are some challenges you have faced and how did you deal with them?

When I was doing research at the museum for the book, I became friendly with Andrew Gray, the curator of the vivarium. He specializes in the conservation of frogs and has done a lot of work to project many endangered species from Costa Rica and other places. His passion and commitment to the Museum is amazing. He was also responsible for getting the museum to publish my book which is a playful look at my boys obsession with the museum and the lizards, frogs and snakes. I think we saw it as a way to engage the younger visitors and to perhaps encourage them to become aware of the conservation involved. The museum features heavily in the book.

Today Oliver is going to the museum - illustration from the book

What can people do to help this cause?

The museum allows the public to sponsor the frogs and to contribute to the cost of research and support for the museum. Oliver recently sponsored a tiger monkey frog and got to meet it and hold it at the museum! You can also buy my book too!

Oliver with the Tiger Monkey Frog at the Manchester museum

How do you reach your targeted audience?
Is it through your website, advertising or social media or another route? Which is most effective and why?

I am trying to promote my book at the moment and I have been doing that through Facebook and Twitter as they both allow you to reach a large volume of people very quickly. It is also a good way of keeping in touch with people and informing them of events and new work. There is also a website for the book where I post features, reviews and workshop projects done with schools and colleges.

school workshop with John Hamilton

How do you keep the audience engaged over time?

Updates on Facebook and Twitter and by creating new links with organizations and groups with similar interests.

Tell us about your events around the world and some of the campaigns you have started.

The book is only available in the UK so that has been my main target but I would love it to go further afield! I have had emails from people in South Africa, Australia, France and the USA who have received the book, many as presents from the UK – so that is exciting!

children looking at tadpoles in manchester museum

What is in the works for the future? What haven’t you yet tackled, but will want to do soon?

I am working on another picture book possibly about butterflies or snails! I am hoping the museum may show an interest in publishing this one too. I want to try and make this one a bit more factual and to include facts and information to allow children to continue their interest in the subject.

Would you like to add a bit more?

No. Just a thank you for the opportunity to talk about the book and hopefully reach a few more people and encourage some more young people to really, really, really love lizards and frogs!

Boy who really really really loves lizards

To find John Hamilton online:

Website: http://www.johnhamiltonillustration.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tbwrrrll
Twitter: @JohnHamilton17

For information on the Manchester Museum and their work with frogs and about sponsoring the frogs visit:
http://frogblogmanchester.com